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National Geographic Giant Traveling Maps
  New Map of South America Coming in October 2010
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Imagine your students scaling the high peaks of the Andes, searching for the ancient city of Machu Picchu, then following the Amazon River from its alpine headwaters thousands of miles through the Brazilian rain forest all the way to the Atlantic Ocean. Or, perhaps they will traverse the fertile Pampas on their way to historic Buenos Aires, then sail southward, bravely navigating Cape Horn and out to the Pacific Ocean to visit the Galápagos Islands! This and more can all happen in an afternoon at your school on the new Giant Traveling Map of South America, our latest in a series of giant maps that promise to make geography come alive for your students in ways they will never forget!
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Visit Our New Website

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Visit Our New Website
Check out our new website for information on how to borrow a map, prices for loans from 2 to 48 weeks, latest news, frequently asked questions, and downloadable curriculum for each map. Return to the site in the future as we add resources for borrowing and for deepening the impact of a map visit to your school, including fund-raising tips and creative ways to share the map with your wider community.
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Now Accepting 2010-2011 Map Requests

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Now Accepting 2010–2011
Map Requests
Schools and other organizations may now submit requests for the Giant Traveling Maps for the 2010–2011 school year. Maps of Africa, North America, Asia, and South America are currently available for loans from 2 to 48 weeks. To request a map, complete this form
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Wyoming Students Travel Through Asia

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Wyoming Students Travel Through Asia
Students of the state of Wyoming are trekking through the Gobi desert, exploring the tropical jungles of Indonesia, and standing on the “roof of the world," thanks to the leadership of the Wyoming Geographic Alliance. Wyoming is the first state to borrow a National Geographic Giant Traveling Map for an entire school year. Read article
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Share Your Story
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Share Your Story
“The National Geographic Giant Traveling Maps are simply amazing. When students and teachers first see a map of this size they are in awe, and when they find out that they can walk on it they get so excited! These giant maps provide students the opportunity to use maps in a whole new way—with their minds and bodies. To me the power of the Giant Traveling Maps is how they get students really engaged and excited about geography–and the excitement lasts long after the map leaves the school.”

—Michelle Leba, social studies teacher, Washington Technology Magnet School, St. Paul, MN, and 2009 National Council for the Social Studies Middle Level Teacher of the Year
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Help Us Name the New Maps!
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Help Us Name the New Maps!
Did you know that our four North America maps are nicknamed Lewis, Clark, Earhart, and Peary? Each Giant Traveling Map has a nickname that reflects the National Geographic spirit of exploration (and helps us keep track of them as they crisscross the country all school year!). With the addition of South America maps we need your students’ help naming these two new maps. Please email name suggestions to dbeaupre@ngs.org by May 1.
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- Where are the Giant Traveling Maps?
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Where are the Giant Traveling Maps?
See where maps are
currently touring the U.S.
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- Do you have any photos or stories about the Giant Traveling Maps to share?
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Do you have any photos or Giant Traveling Maps stories to share?
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Send us your photos and stories about the Giant Traveling Maps, and they may be featured on our website or in future newsletters. Send to dbeaupre@ngs.org
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- Is your school located near Seattle?
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Is your school located near Seattle?
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Attend exciting National Geographic Live student matinees featuring National Geographic explorers in Seattle.
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- Get your school involved in next year's geography bee
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Is your school located near Seattle?Each year thousands of schools participate in the National Geographic Bee. Find out how to get your school registered for next year’s competition.
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Photographs by Bo Garrett (girls, socks, tights, ocean), Dan Beaupré (Joel Sartore Presenting),
Courtesy Michelle Leba (portrait), Judy Kallal (Wyoming, new map name)
National Geographic Giant Traveling Maps are produced by National Geographic Live—the live-events division of the National Geographic Society, producing multimedia presentations, performances, and film screenings for the general public, school audiences, and sponsoring organizations throughout the world.
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